'Sockeye Salmon Oncorhynchus Nerka' round ceramic plaque
'Sockeye Salmon Oncorhynchus Nerka' round ceramic plaque
'Sockeye Salmon Oncorhynchus Nerka' round ceramic plaque
'Sockeye Salmon Oncorhynchus Nerka' round ceramic plaque
Ceramic Tile Murals, Ceramic tile, Trivet, Kokanee Salmon
  "Salmon are so lively and interesting.  I am fascinated by the way the light reflects on the fish's scales and the changing colors and characteristics of the different salmon species;  Sockeye, KokaneeChinook, Atlantic, Coho and even the similarly colorful  Rainbow Trout.  The combination of rippling water, river rocks, reeds and the salmon themselves inspire me to paint them.   Whether you love fishing or just enjoy the serenity of nature for itself these ceramics will provide a colorful addition to any home or office.  They are a soothing reminder of nature at its best."  
~ Frédérique Lavios, artist
'Sockeye Salmon Oncorhynchus Nerka' round ceramic plaque
About Salmon and Trout:

Species

Atlantic Ocean species
Atlantic ocean species (Salmo salar), is the species after which all the others are named.

Pacific Ocean species
Pacific species belong to the genus Oncorhynchus, some examples include;

Cherry salmon (Oncorhynchus masu or O. masou) is found only in the western Pacific Ocean in Japan, Korea and Russia and also landlocked in central Taiwan's Chi Chia Wan Stream.
Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) is also known locally as King, Tyee, Spring Salmon, Quinnat, Tule, or Blackmouth salmon. Chinook are the largest of all Pacific salmon, frequently exceeding 30 lbs. (14 kg).
Chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) is known locally as Dog or Calico salmon. This species has the widest geographic range of the Pacific species[9] : south to the Sacramento River in California in the eastern Pacific and the island of Kyūshū in the Sea of Japan in the western Pacific; north to the Mackenzie River in Canada in the east and to the Lena River in Siberia in the west.
Coho salmon or Silver salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) is found throughout the coastal waters of Alaska and British Columbia and up most clear-running streams and rivers.
Pink salmon or Humpback salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha), known as humpies in south east Alaska, is found from northern California and Korea, throughout the northern Pacific, and from the Mackenzie River in Canada to the Lena River in Siberia, usually in shorter coastal streams. It is the smallest of the Pacific species, with an average weight of 3.5 to 4 lbs. (1.6 - 1.8 kg).
Sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) is known locally as "Red Salmon" or "Blueback Salmon".This lake-spawning species is found south as far as the Klamath River in California in the eastern Pacific and northern Hokkaidō Island in Japan in the western Pacific and as far north as Bathurst Inlet in the Canadian Arctic in the east and the Anadyr River in Siberia in the west. Although most adult Pacific salmon feed on small fish and insects, sockeyes feed on plankton that they filter through gill rakers.

Other species
Land-locked salmon (Salmo salar sebago) live in a number of lakes in eastern North America. This subspecies of Atlantic Salmon is non-migratory, even when access to the sea is not barred. Kokanee salmon is a land-locked form of sockeye.  Huchen or Danube salmon (Hucho hucho), the largest permanent fresh water salmonid.

References
^ Chinook Salmon. Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Retrieved on 2006-11-17.
^ Chum Salmon. Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Retrieved on 2006-11-17.
^ Pink Salmon. Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Retrieved on 2006-11-17.
^ Sockeye Salmon. Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Retrieved on 2006-11-17.
^ Prose Edda by Snorri Sturluson
Ceramic tile, Trivet, Leaping Salmon_Salmon Run_fishing
Murals shown are approx.18" x 24" using 6" x 6" tiles.
  Other sizes available.
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Tile trim not included.
Click to enlarge 'Spawing Salmon' Tile Mural
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